Restorative Justice PBL Project

Originally developed by
John Taylor (View Original)

Restorative Justice PBL Project

Restorative justice is a philosophy and an approach that views crime and conflict as harm done to people and relationships. It is a non-adversarial, non-retributive approach to justice that emphasizes healing in victims, accountability of offenders, and the involvement of citizens in creating healthier, safer communities. The goal is to reach meaningful, satisfying, and fair outcomes through inclusion, open communication, and truth. Districts that have adopted Discipline That Restores report a stronger campus community, reduced bullying and fights, and a significant reduction in suspensions and expulsions. Students feel safer, teachers feel safer, and with reduced conflict and tension in the classroom, the learning environment becomes much more positive and productive. Lesson 1 - Students will explore Restorative Justice, a process for civil wrongs, classroom discipline, tort of negligence, problem solving, and conflict resolution. Lesson 2 - Students will practice writing, listening, discussion, and research skills as they examine policies around juvenile sentencing in the United States. Lesson 3 - Judging can be quite a challenge, assessing the difference between a series of real life incidents will be challenging. The students will provide an analysis of crimes that have been committed. They will have to answer the guiding question(s) and discuss their answers. Lesson 4 - In addition to the constitutional Amendments, there are several U.S. statutes that deal with protecting people’s constitutional rights from conspiracies and from abuse by law enforcement. Violation of these codes is a crime. Students will explore these amendments and statutes as well as what it means to make a "Citizen's Arrest."? This project is brought to you by John Taylor (CTE) with support from the CTE Online curriculum leadership team and detailed coordination provided by the Course Team Lead Gregg Witkin.
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