Crime Scenes as Assessment Tools PBL Project

Originally developed by
Gordon Sanford (View Original)

Crime Scenes as Assessment Tools PBL Project

Haven't you ever been tempted to create the "perfect crime"? Now's your chance. Crime scene processing is a highly anticipated activity by students in any forensic science class. Curiosity from all they have seen on TV and movies combined with enthusiasm to being able to actually do these activities themselves together creates an ideal learning environment. In the PBL Project Crime Scenes as Assessment Tools, you will learn how to provide students with crime scenes to process to allow them to practice all the forensic science skills that have been introduced as the year progresses. Forensic investigations involve established protocols, from confirming safety at the crime scene for processing, to redundant analysis of evidence in the laboratory preparing for court room testimony. In this series of four lessons, teachers will learn how to set up a crime scene, use PERKs (Physical Evidence Recover Kits), and lead students through labs to detect blood and amylase. In respect to NGSS, all Forensic activities involve : -Analyzing and Interpreting Data -Asking questions and Defining Problems -Engaging in Argument from Evidence -Obtaining, Evaluating and Communicating Information In this Project the following NGSS standards are identified: K-PS2-1 (direction of force/sequence of fractures in glass for a forced entry) HS-LS3-1 (DNA sources, collection and analysis) HS-LS3-3 (DNA analysis and court room statistical/probability presentations, shoe impression to potential height) HS-ETS1-3 (Blood stain/pattern analysis, angle of impact and point of origin determinations) MS-ETS1-3 (Blood stain/pattern analysis, angle of impact and point of origin determinations) This unit is brought to you by Gordon Sanford with support from the CTE Online curriculum leadership team and detailed coordination provided by Joshua Bradley.
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